Does Moving as a Child Create Adult Baggage?

Yesterday I wrote about a new study highlighting potential problems for people who move a lot during childhood. The study raised a lot of interesting questions, some of which it answered statistically, some hypothetically. Does moving during childhood negatively affect people? Do the affects last past childhood, shaping who we are as adults? Do the reasons for the move matter? Are children whose parents from the military different from other kids in the way their experience dislocation? I found that the comments posed on The New York Times website, where people really opened up and shared their own experiences, really enriched the story. I was also very excited to see that the story hit the top 25 most emailed stories for the entire NYT website. And I am grateful to Lisa Belkin for pointing readers to the story on her Motherlode blog.

2 thoughts on “Does Moving as a Child Create Adult Baggage?

  1. Linda Randall

    loved your article about Mary Karr book called Lit – july 9th, 2010 – the author takes a star turn in cultural studies of fashion & style.. i’ve been trying to tell authors to make book trailers to boost their sales.. I’ll be posting info on your book parenting inc. and mary’s along with some IDEAS on how to make those videos go viral and what to do in the meantime to boost your book sales.. I’d love some feedback that once I put it out there, let me know how your sales do.. because I can promise you both, you’ll be making more 🙂

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  2. Jen

    Indeed, the comments were very much an enriching sidebar to this article. I believe in synchronicity and giggle at the timing of my accidental discovery of this piece. I’ve gone back and forth in my beliefs about the impacts of moving on kids. One of my close friends is a diplomat and I’ve had a handful of argument/discussions with her about the impact of multiple moves on young children. She always has said “it’s the family that makes the difference,” implying kids who feel close to their family members and feel safe within the confines of their family will adjust easily.

    I’m not so sure about that. I moved only to the next town over when I was an adolescent and that was a trigger for anxiety for me. My husband has a similar story, moving from the States abroad and back to the States again. Both of us came from safe and stable family environments. Now we’re contemplating a move abroad with our three young children. I have mixed feelings and it’s hard to anticipate what will be. I’m not sure this study moves me in one direction or another. (Studies in general don’t me. I’m much more moved by anecdotal evidence.)

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